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Crocheted Ripple Beret & Scarf help

First of all I would like to give thanks for this site being available. I am a "self" taught crocheter and have learned so much just from the help of these forums and consider myself to be at the "intermediate" level of skill!

Before posting this I researched the old and new forums to see if this question has been discussed and was not able to find any info that I am looking for.

I attempted to make the beret only from the free pattern Crocheted Ripple Beret & Scarf. The pattern for the beret has 26 rounds listed. My finished product looked like just the very top part of the beret that sits upon the top of the head, ((the flat part) it did not have the band that would go around the forhead. I ended up with 40 sc as instructed on round
# 23. The size of my finished product appears to be correct for the flat section of the beret only. I am extremely confused. I worked the beret in the round as it suggested and used the appropriate yarn and hook as suggested and checked gauge. On the page where the pattern is located there is a picture of what appears to be the "band" but I dont see anywhere in the pattern that would allow this piece to be made. What did I do wrong? any help would be forever appreciated. I tried making this as a Christmas gift for my 15 yo neice who absolutely adores beret's and I would love to make a few more for her so I am begging of anyone out there for some help! Thank you again for any suggestions.

I was thinking that I could just make a seperate band only (like making a regular type ski hat) and then attach that to the exsisting flat part but I am not as advanced to figure out how many stitches to start out with and end up with a product that looks like it's all one piece. I dont even know if that is possible. So I am reaching out to all you talented fellow crocheter's to come rescue me!! Have a great day--->Cheyann's Mom

 
Cheyanns Mom wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

Beret

Hi Alex.
Thank you for your clarification on your last post, I was able to determine what it was you were trying to say so no sweat there!! Thank you!

I was thinking that it might make a difference with the joining ( just speculation though) be cause in the 2nd picture on the pattern page,it appears as tho they are stitching from the outside of the ring to achieve the ring that is pictured- where when I was crocheting the project on Round # 2 I worked my 8 sc from within the ring
( just as making a doily or something else made in the round (if I am making any sense) when i was finished with that round my product looked like the 1st picture posted on the pattern page! nowhere within working did I I ever achieve the large ring so I do not know if joining with the 1st sc would have caused this difference...... Please forgive my ignorance and lack of experience but I feel if I dont ask questions I will never learn.. So thank you again for your time in helping me to figure where I went wrong!!
Sincerely
Cheyanns Mom

should have edited my post better. When I was writing about the crocheted-on rib band, I should have said that I attach the yarn to the hat, work a chain the length of the width I want for the band (plus one stitch for turning), then work a sc row in the back loops all the way back to the hat. Then I work a stitch in the hat and then back down the back loops to the edge. Then I just repeat this action all around the hat edge.

From the way I wrote it, it sounds as though I work the width of the band and then work the next stitch into the hat again. Not so.

I'm wondering from your last post how joining could make that big a difference in your finished project. Some patterns work a spiral, some concentric circles. Pretty much just a design distinction

 
alex wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

hat band

I should have edited my post better. When I was writing about the crocheted-on rib band, I should have said that I attach the yarn to the hat, work a chain the length of the width I want for the band (plus one stitch for turning), then work a sc row in the back loops all the way back to the hat. Then I work a stitch in the hat and then back down the back loops to the edge. Then I just repeat this action all around the hat edge.

From the way I wrote it, it sounds as though I work the width of the band and then work the next stitch into the hat again. Not so.

I'm wondering from your last post how joining could make that big a difference in your finished project. Some patterns work a spiral, some concentric circles. Pretty much just a design distinction.

 
Cheyanns Mom wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

Beret

Thank you Alex for your prompt response! I thank you for your suggestions and I will certainly try to make a "band" as you suggested. because the way that it ended up there is just absoulutely no way it would fit anything (maybe a small baby doll) !! and it is a really cute cap but Like I said it only appears to be just the flat part of the top of the beret-- But I think that I know what I might have done wrong! see below

Alex,
Yes, this is the correct pattern that I am refering to and I understand what you are saying, I think (maybe) where I messed up is with the starting chain where it states on round #2 to work 8 sc in the ring and DO NOT join to the first sc... I think this is where I messed up, I think that I did join to the 1st sc which would cause the results that I obtained. So I think that I will try agian (after Christmas) to make this and I will let you know if the results are any better.
Thank you Alex and Craftsman again for responding so quickly to my delimma. I truly appreciate the time and effort you both took to help me.

Sincerely Cheyanns Mom
Best wishes and
Have the safest of Holidays!.

 
alex wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

tam/beret band

I looked at the picture and it seems that the pattern is probably okay (just) but that the edge is manipulated quite a bit.

Berets generally don't have a band (think of the felted French berets). The fabric usually rolls slightly to the inside and hugs the head.

Tams generally have a band. Depending on how they are constructed and blocked, they can appear to shoot straight out from the band or increase gradually to the widest point.

If you want a real band, you don't have to construct something separate and sew it on (although that's certainly an option). You could crochet a band and crochet it to the edge of the hat. And there are two other options. One thing that I like particularly is to work a band around the edge with a crocheted ribbing. I attach the yarn, work a few stitches to the width that I want the band to be, work a single crochet sitch in the back loop, attach the next stitch to the hat, work back to the edge of the band. I continue this around the edge of the hat. The stitches are then perpendicular to the stitches of the hat and they form a really separate looking band. By working in the back loop only on each row you get a ribbing effect. It's not necessary, but it is a little more elastic.

The other option is to continue with several more rows of straight (no decreases or increases) crocheting to the hat. This will form a shaft which will serve as a band. As the pattern stands, there are only a couple of straight rows and, I agree, unless the hat is pulled around quite a bit, it's not going to look like a real band.

 
craftsman wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

Crocheted Ripple Beret & Scarf help

I'm looking at the pattern on http://www.craftyarncouncil.com/jan99_crochproj.html - is that the right one?

When you finish step 6, you will have 5 rounds (not counting the starting ring).
Steps 7 and 8 together add 2 more; step 9 (=working steps 7 and 8) adds 2 more. That's 9 rounds.
Steps 10 and 11 together add 2 more; step 12 (=working steps 10 and 11) adds 2 more. That's 13 rounds.
Steps 13 and 14 together add 2 more; step 15 (=working steps 13 and 14) adds 2 more; step 16 adds 1 more.
That's 18 rounds, ending with 98 sts. (I didn't count sts; that's according to the instructions).
The beret is at its widest.

Now the decreases begin.
Steps 17 and 18 together add 2 rounds; step 19 (=working steps 17 and 18) adds 2 more. That's 22 rounds.
Steps 20 and 21 together add 2 rounds; step 22 (=working steps 20 and 21) adds 2 more. That's 26 rounds.
Steps 23, 24 and 25 each add a round. That's 29 rounds.
Step 26 uses slip stitches to finish off.

Does that give you something to compare your work to, and hopefully see what's different?
- craftsman

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